Tag: poetry

Write Poetry

Poetry Comes Naturally

It’s easier than you think. Just grab a piece of paper along with a working pen or a sharp pencil and begin writing your own genuine poem. While sitting on the couch or near the shore, regardless if you are alone or surrounded by strangers, poetry is one of those art forms you can explore any time. If you are keen to visit poetry readings and you are known for your love of poetry books, perhaps it is time to explore your own ability to express your feelings and inner thoughts…

It’s easier than you think. Just grab a piece of paper along with a working pen or a sharp pencil and begin writing your own genuine poem. While sitting on the couch or near the shore, regardless if you are alone or surrounded by strangers, poetry is one of those art forms you can explore any time. If you are keen to visit poetry readings and you are known for your love of poetry books, perhaps it is time to explore your own ability to express your feelings and inner thoughts through an unconventional type of language use.

Intellectual disputes over the definition of poetry and its distinction from other genres of literature were inextricably intertwined with the debate over the role of poetic form. As the twentieth century coincided with the rejection of traditional forms and structures for poetry, people began questioning the purpose and meaning of traditional definitions for poetry and its unclear distinction from prose. Poetry, throughout the world today, often reflects the incorporation of poetic form and diction from other cultures as well as from the past and present practices, further complicating the numerous attempts of scholars to define and classify what once was confound within the tradition of the Western canon.

Poetry depends less on sentences and particular paragraphs than prose. The major structural elements of poetry generally are the line, the stanza or verse paragraph, and larger combinations of stanzas or lines such as cantos. In addition, the basic units of poetic form are often combined into larger structures, called poetic forms, such as the sonnet. From Homer’s and William Shakespeare’s poems to contemporary award winning poets, language, rhythm, meter, and intonation have been studied extensively over the years in an effort to determine and classify poets, cultures and social times. Furthermore, rhyme, alliteration, assonance and consonance, as methods for creating repetitive patterns of sound, have each greatly been influenced by the particular language used and the era of a poem’s creation. Since languages vary in the richness of their rhyming structures, in some languages, like Italian, for example, with its rich rhyming structure, it is possible to maintain a limited set of rhymes throughout a lengthy poem. In some cases, particularly lengthier formal poetry, such as some forms of epic poetry, stanzas are constructed according to strict rules and then combined to form unity.

In addition to the different structures and lengths of poems or poetic forms, the selection of particular words and meanings greatly influence a poem’s ability to be interpreted by the reader. Aristotle wrote in the Poetics that “the greatest thing by far is to be a master of metaphor.” Whether your poem will include one or more types of metaphors, its poetic diction, the manner in which you will use language to convey the underlying meaning in combination to the sound and form, will be the first thing a reader will experience. Rhetorical devices, such as a metaphor, as well as tones of voice, such as irony, can “add meaning” to your poem and alter the connotation of the words used. It is known that allegorical stories are central to poetic diction for many cultures. But regardless of your poem’s structural form, tone, rhythm, or language, attempting to write one can indeed increase your understanding on other people’s poetic attempts and help you “translate” and understand different cultures, while increasing your language aesthetic palette.

Poetry Reborn

Cassius Clay

Poetry “Reborn” Emerges In Thriller Mystery Novel

Since Mohamed Ali–then Cassius Clay–announced that he had written “The world’s shortest poem,” I have known that I would be a poet. “ME? WHEE!” His triumphant proclamation evoking shivers within my troubled teenaged identity, for I reasoned in rhyme.

Since Mohamed Ali–then Cassius Clay–announced that he had written “The world’s shortest poem,” I have known that I would be a poet. “ME? WHEE!” His triumphant proclamation evoking shivers within my troubled teenaged identity, for I reasoned in rhyme.

Everyday, hundreds-of-thousands of seemingly sane souls satisfy some innate need to bare their concealed character via atrocious alliteration or in delusional doggerel. As in Kris Kristofferson’s early works, the marvelous magic masquerades within sweet musical lyrics, providing us with eternal material transcending generational barriers.

Even if none but we are ever allowed to examine our hidden essence, an inner longing is unleashed–only to be squished–should we presume to be published.

In1978, I self-published my first poetry book, Beacon©, to an enthusiastic reception of some uninformed who didn’t realize, fearing rejection, I had never submitted my musings to somber publishers. After all, Rod McKuen, suffering countless rejections, had self-published. And he was said–at that time–to be, “The world’s most widely read poet.”

To the accolade of local yokel fans, the following year, I followed up with Imperfections©, Verse by Russ Miles, songs and thoughts reflecting who, where, and what I was–at that time in my life. Even more well received, I was enjoying the affirmative attention of a metropolitan newspaper poetry editor insisting that I co-chair a college invitational symposium for wantabe poets with the State Poet LaTourette. My books selling well, a youthful, insatiable ego was being satisfactorily stroked.

Then, a strange thing happened. I caught a case of conscience. What if an unforgiving God held me accountable for my wanton actions or the impact of foisting my unholy understandings upon innocents?

Frightening purgatorial–or worse–reprisal prospects triggered instantaneous actions. Removing all remaining copies from the marketplaces which I had developed for distribution, I stopped penning poetry for the next twenty-five years.

Disabled at age fifty-three by Multiple Sclerosis, I found myself writing another book, For Sale By Owners:FSBO©. A mystery thriller novel evolved offering some insights that only a self-absorbed, worldly man of three messed-upped marriages could possibly convey.

I continue learning that God is so forgiving. How He can inspire good to come of all things. Even some of my old songs are once more awaiting discovery thanks to Red Haring, the song-writing, truck-driving character appearing between the FSBO covers.

By today’s standards, Red Haring’s vivid verse words and wayward rhyme renderings are no longer abysmal. Rather they reflect the subtle “It’s all about me” immoral fiber of a masculine male–wrestling with post 9-11 internal issues–choosing to make changes in his so self-consumed life. Red’s songs emerge to stimulate reflections within Brooklyn Best, the no-saint heroine, real estate agent with whom he becomes romantically involved.

They end up working together to unravel some horrific homicides~in this reality based mystery~thriller novel. Through its use in a sub-plot, my poetry is being reborn.

As for Beacon© and Imperfections©, perhaps I’ll offer my few remaining hand signed & numbered “First Edition” & “Limited Edition” poetry books on e-Bay®. After all, John Grisham’s originally published novels are now collector’s items aren’t they?

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Kinds of Poetry

Kinds of poetry

New Types Of Poetry

A few new types of poetry to play with or use as inspiration for your own new forms.

There are many different types of poetry. I counted 50 on a quick search of the internet. You may have heard of Haiku and Limericks. There are the more obscure types too, like Terzanelle and Sestina. Learning different types of poetry though, isn’t nearly as much fun as inventing your own, so here are some ideas about that.

Types Of Poetry – Playing With Stanzas

What is a stanza? A division of a poem consisting of two or more lines. How many ways can you structure a stanza? As many as you want. Look at this stanza from the poem, “Gratitude:”

So there is nothing to say

There is nothing to say

There is nothing

Nothing…

But gratitude

Each line is a smaller part of the previous line. In this case, it quiets the mind in order to emphasize the last word: gratitude. However, this idea could be used in many ways. You could start with a line like, “She watched the birds come in from the sea,” and it can reduce to, “Come in from the sea;” “From the sea:” “Where Michael was left alone in the storm.”

Each stanza could have lengthening lines. Lines could be varied in length to create a picture on the page. Playing with stanzas is a fun way to create new types of poetry.

Ideas For New Types Of Poetry

In the poem “Do Not Believe In God,” each stanza starts with one of our senses: “See God… in stars and sunlight… and the face of your lover;” Hear God… in wind and waves… and the music of the birds.” All the senses are covered. How could we use this general idea? By starting each stanza with a different verb or adjective? By starting each stanza with a different person’s name? By having each stanza get smaller or larger as the poem progresses?

How many ways can you play with poems? “Dream poems,” could be a type of poetry that puts actual dreams into verse. “Dialog poems” could have stanzas or lines answering each other back and forth. A series of poems could use all the exact same words, rearranged, with an entirely different outcome in each. There are endless types of poetry you can create.

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The Love Poem

Lovers

Long Live The Love Poem

Long live love poems: There’s no chance the love poem is dead, the reason? Because the one you write is for the one you cherish the most and it will be a part of you both forever.

There’s no chance the love poem is dead, the reason? Because the one you write is for the one you cherish the most and it will be a part of you both forever. Writing a poem is all about observing the world within you or around you and leaving all expectations behind.

For the cash-strapped, or romantically inclined, writing a sincere, well thought out love poem may be just the ticket to your loved one’s heart. Love poems, friendship poems, sad poems, romantic poems, or any poem that you can think of may mean more to someone then any gift ever could. If you are writing challenged, poems-online.com can show you how to write the perfect poem to get the one you’re after.
For example, romantic love poems exhibit an intense sense of love felt by a lover but must also poses the elements of a poem: elegant structure, classic rhyme scheme, and beautiful imagery.
How? Well poetry’s use of ambiguity, symbolism, irony and other stylistic elements of diction often leave a poem open to multiple interpretations. As we’ve often discussed, poetry can be about anything.
You should view poetry in an entirely new and innovative way. For example, Edgar Allan Poe, although probably best known for his macabre stories, also wrote poetry and loved to experiment with the sounds of words.
While some may find poetry intimidating or irrelevant, there are people who poetry as Hope. I’ve been writing poetry since I was about 11 years old and wouldn’t know what to do without it.
Are you interested in writing poetry or learning the process involved in crafting a poem? Then start writing instantly, right now, go and give your writing on paper.
There are many different techniques and forms you can use when writing a poem, but we won’t go into them here because, honestly, they aren’t that important. Writing a poem is all about observing the world within you or around you. Try writing out an answer to the question, “What is this poem about.
It’s true that many of us tend to be jaded when it comes to romantic writing as it seems old fashioned. When I’m writing a poem, I hardly consider its contemporary context. Writing a poem is a voyage of discovery. Besides, a poem can be about anything — pets, family, friends, things you like to do. Your poem is not an editorial. Your poem is very good and beautiful. Read it out loud, slowly!
As is true of most of us, the poet’s understanding of an experience is a gradual realization, and the poem is a reflection of that epiphany. So nobody truly knows where the poem is, nor should they. As soon as a poem is finished to your satisfaction, mail a copy to a trusted friend and ask him or her to keep it along with the cancelled envelope. For time waits for no man.

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Poetry Contests

Poetry Award

How to Up Your Chances of Winning Poetry Contests

Looking to win a poetry contest? With so many poetry contests available both online and in poetry journals, you don’t have to look too hard to find one that suits your writing style and your wallet. But before you go entering contests, there are a few important tips considerations to make.
With so many poetry contests available both online and in poetry journals, you don’t have to look too hard to find one that suits your writing style and your wallet. While some poetry contests are free to enter, they may not have a great prize in return. On the other hand, some poetry contests that charge you ten or fifteen dollars to enter do not really offer you a lot in return. Spending fifteen dollars to win one hundred when you are competing with hundreds or even thousands of other writers is not a good gamble.

So when you find a contest that has both a tolerable entry fee and a reasonable payoff, you can enter. You may need to look at several contests before you decide on one that is right for you in terms of style. It is important to read the work of previous winners online if possible.

If the contest is sponsored by a university publication or a literary journal, you should pick up a copy or two of this journal to see what type of poetry appeals to the editors. Pay attention to the theme of the issue as it could affect the kind of poetry you read for that month. Try reading another theme to see if the style is similar even if the subject matter has changed. Then when you find a place that seems to publish work that is similar in style and tone to yours, check out the guidelines.

This is probably the best thing you can do, besides have natural talent, to win a poetry contest: follow the guidelines. It is not impressive to editors or contest judges if you try to be unique by straying from these rules. They are in place for a reason. Usually, this reason is to make the job of the editors and judges easier. They will be inundated with entries. If all the pages are uniform and the type is big enough to read, their lives will be much less stressful. If you are the one with the odd sized paper and blue font, you will make a bad impression rather than a memorable one.

So stick to the guidelines about page size, usually a standard eight by ten sheet of printer paper. Also use a font that is readable, at least an eleven or twelve point in something like New Courier, Arial, or Times New Roman. Also be sure that you follow guidelines about having you name and contact information on the page. Some people want a copy of your poem with no name on it so that judging is not biased by previously published work.

Remember to note whether or not you can go over one page for your poem. If they want you to stick to one page, this is not license to create two columns of stanzas on one sheet of paper, nor is it appropriate to shrink your type to a size that will fit a too-long poem on a single page. If your poem is too long, pick another one to enter or find another contest.

Finally, use the editor’s name in your cover letter and double check spelling. Be professional rather than artistic in your presentation.

You can find a list of poetry contests to enter at http://www.poetrycontests.biz/

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Gilleland Poetry

Snake in the grass

Gilleland Poetry – Storoems and Poems ~ Review

Retired professor of Microbiology, Harry Gilleland certainly has a wide variety of experiences and thought-provoking insights to share in his latest poetry book…

Retired professor of Microbiology, Harry Gilleland certainly has a wide variety of experiences and thought-provoking insights to share in his latest poetry book, Gilleland Poetry – Storoems and Poems. Harry’s poetry has appeared at numerous establishments over the years and he has authored three books to date. His dedication to and love of poetry is evident in the way that he writes his work.

Evocative and mentally stimulating throughout it’s 205 pages this book is sure to strike a cord within any reader. War experiences and trials of man are mingled with true-life experiences, fantasy, love and nature.

Harry explores the wonders of nature in a beautiful way and returns to the theme that seemingly runs throughout the entire book – what it could mean for man. Fun, playful – sometimes sad. He has us riding the rapids with him one moment and learning shocking news about American history in the next breath.

You Snake in the Grass is one of my favorites because it invokes awe of nature. But I also got a real kick out of The Power of Splinters and One Leaf’s Journey, which are clearly parallels to life experiences.

I really cried over A Journey Home and Alfred Must Die. The author’s deep endearing love for his wife is both moving and inspiring.

Though this might sound a little corny – I felt I lived a little more because of reading this book.

ISBN#: 1411629272
Author: Harry E. Gilleland, JR
Publisher: Lulu Press

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A Growing Demand for Poetry Books

Poetry quote

Poetry Gaining Popularity

Summary:

Where were you when American poetess Sylvia Plath gassed herself in her London kitchen at the age of 30 during the harsh winter of 1963?
Not perhaps the stuff our memories are made of, but all that could change. There is a distinct revival worldwide of interest in poetry and poets. This is expressed in the increased purchase of poetry books – anthologies and works by individual poets – in the new and secondhand book markets.

Where were you when American poetess Sylvia Plath gassed herself in her London kitchen at the age of 30 during the harsh winter of 1963?

Not perhaps the stuff our memories are made of, but all that could change. There is a distinct revival worldwide of interest in poetry and poets. This is expressed in the increased purchase of poetry books – anthologies and works by individual poets – in the new and secondhand book markets.

There are a number of reasons for this:

The internet allows the discussion and publication of poetry in a way previously impossible considering the uneconomic nature of the physical publishing poetry and publishing critiques, both amateur and academic.

The brash and materialistic eighties preceded the fantastic and terrified nineties. Now here we are here in the middle of the first decade of the 21st century, more sober and reflective, wondering where the world is going.

Out of this a generation is emerging a present-day version of the 60’s and 70’s dreamers and idealists. They want more than self-help books, more than herbal remedies and fatuous fantasies. There is a return to serious intellectual examination and spiritual actualization.

And by serious I don’t mean lacking in humor. I’m talking about intellectual acuity (take the works of travel poet Bill Bryson for instance) compared to idiotic ramblings (say the books of creative conspiracy theorist David Icke). Bryson is funny and perceptive while Icke is obtuse and laughable. There’s a big difference. We are moving away from weak thoughts to profundity.

Can there be any explanation other than this when a 17-year-old youth enters our bookshop asking for The Complete Works of Byron, or when a blonde girl no older than 15 says she is searching for the poems of Shelley?

In a decade of book-selling this has never happened before. Suddenly we are buying poetry books again to meet demand, and retrieving the slim poetry books we relegated to boxes in the basement, to create a special poetry section.

This makes sense of the revival of interest in the sixties ballad-poets: Leonard Cohen and Joan Baez. Once again Bob Dylan is speaking to the contemporary generation. T.S. Eliot and Ted Hughes are being discussed again. The demand for the work of Lebanese poet Kahlil Gibran can barely be met. Dylan Thomas is revisited. There is renewed interest in the war poets and so-called world poetry: the Senegalese, Thai, French and Swedish poets.

And why not? It is possible because the books are available and affordable, thanks to the international online book-buying market and the renewed interest in poetic thought.

Can a rediscovery of Shakespeare’s sonnets and Milton’s Paradise Lost be far off? Horde any old poetry books and poetry anthologies you still have. You could catch your children reading them one day in a way you never did.
Call it poetic justice.

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5 Funny Love Poems

THE PEOPLE'S PARK IN LIMERICK

Summary:

When most people think of love poems, they think of serious and soulful expressions of passion. Long sonnets by Shakespeare or romantic poems by Browning and Lord Byron are the norm for love poetry. However, funny love poems can be good for a laugh. They may not be romantic, but they do give your friends something to enjoy. Here are 5 funny limericks from anonymous authors.

Funny Love Poems

When most people think of love poems, they think of serious and soulful expressions of passion. Long sonnets by Shakespeare or romantic poems by Browning and Lord Byron are the norm for love poetry. However, funny love poems can be good for a laugh. They may not be romantic, but they do give your friends something to enjoy.

Some of the best funny love poems are limericks. Limericks started in Ireland and follow a standard form of five lines and a rhyme scheme of aabba. Here are a few limericks written by anonymous authors:

There once was an old man of Lyme
Who married three wives at a time
When asked “Why a third?”
He replied, “One’s absurd!
And bigamy, Sir, is a crime.”

There was a young fellow named Hammer
Whose had an unfortunate stammer
“The b-bane of my life”
Said he, “Is m-m-my wife
D-d-d-d-d-d-damn ‘er!”

She made friends with a young undertaker;
Her last boyfriend had forsaken her.
But she started to curse
When he turned up in a hearse.
She said next time I’ll date a baker!

There was a young lady named Constance,
From boys she wouldn’t stand any nonsense.
If her partners grew deft
She would lead with her left;
The results would not weigh on her conscience.

My sweetheart and I are just wed.
Already I wish I were dead.
Two weeks she’s been spending.
It was time never ending.
We are thousands of pounds in the red!

Limericks are fairly easy to write if you can rhyme well, so you might try writing a limerick yourself that includes the name of your friend or loved one. This is a good way to make a funny love poem that is personalized.

You can find more information about funny poems at:
http://www.love-poems-quotes.info/funny-love-poems.html

photo by:
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An Introduction to the Romantic Poets

William Wordsworth

 

An Introduction to the Romantic Poets

By Matt Paul

The Enlightenment

The Enlightenment was an intellectual movement in Europe between about 1660 and 1770. It emphasised the power of human reason to explain the nature of the world and the universe, to bring greater happiness and progress to humanity, and to fight against ignorance, superstition and injustice. It tended to challenge traditional forms of knowledge and power. In terms of the arts, the Enlightenment valued clarity, harmony, balance, classical elegance and precision in writing.

Romanticism

A major cultural shift in Western Europe took place during the late 18th Century and early 19th Century. Important characteristics of this change included:

� A rejection of the Enlightenment emphasis on reason, in favour of feeling and imagination.

� An interest in the self, introspection, extreme psychological states, and the subjective nature of reality.

� An understanding of children and ‘primitive’ peoples as innately innocent and pure, uncorrupted by civilistion (rather than born into sin).

� A rejection of the Enlightenment idea of nature as an impersonal mechanism in favour of the idea of nature as dynamic, powerful, restorative and spiritual.

� An emphasis on the power and autonomy of the creative imagination, and its importance as a way of apprehending the spiritual nature of reality.

� Revolutionary and utopian politics (and a perceived link between the political and artistic revolution).

The relationship between Enlightenment and Romanticism is complex; if Romanticism can be seen as in part a reaction to the Enlightenment, it was also influenced by certain Enlightenment forms and preoccupations.

The five most influential Romantic Poets

� William Blake (1757 – 1827)): Blake worked throughout his adult life as an engraver (he had no formal schooling); he was a remarkable painter, as well as a poet and mystic. He was relatively obscure during his lifetime. Blake was a political radical, despised organised religion and was also arrested for treason.

� William Wordsworth (1770 – 1850): Wordsworth is arguably the pre-eminent poet of the Romantic period (though not in terms of sales); an early adherent to revolutionary principles, he went on to become a Burkean conservative and Government placeholder, and lived most of his life in the Lake District. (MP Edmund Burke published Reflections on the Revolution in France. Burke greeted the French Revolution with horror. The Reflections argued that the abstract ideas of ‘rights’ applicable to all people at all times are false. Burke argued instead for the respect of established hierarchies and customs.)

� Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772 – 1834): Coleridge was a friend of Wordsworth and followed a similar political trajectory: he produced a small number of great poems and was also a critic and philosopher.

� Lord Byron (1788 – 1824): Byron is a celebrated and controversial figure. He left England in 1816. Although poems such as Child Harolde’s Pilgrimage are highly Romantic in style, Byron was suspicious of the writing of his contemporaries and venerated neo-classical writers like Pope.

� Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792 – 1822): Shelley was the eldest son of a baronet; an atheist and political radical whose verse is often philosophical and formally complex. He was vilified by critics and largely ignored by readers. He was friends with Byron and drowned in Italy at the age of 29.

� John Keats (1795 – 1821): Keats was born to middle-class parents and trained as a surgeon. His poetic abilities developed with extraordinary speed. He was mocked by critics as a talentless ‘Cockney’. His poetry focused on human morality, art and the natural world. He died of tuberculosis at the age of 25.

Macclesfield Tutorial College [http://www.macctutorialcollege.com] is an independent college, and offers full time and part time courses to students from 16 years old to adult. The college offers GCSE and A Level courses is a wide range of subjects. The college offers a high level of education, resulting in a predominant number of students going onto higher education. The college can be contacted at office@experttutorials.co.uk

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Matt_Paul
http://EzineArticles.com/?An-Introduction-to-the-Romantic-Poets&id=6440738

References

Romantic poetry – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Poet Seers » The Romantic Poets

A Brief Guide to Romanticism | Academy of American Poets

The Romantic Era – Sonnet Central

Poets of the Romantic Era in England – DateHookup

Romantic Poetry in English Literature – Videos & Lessons

British Romantic Era Poets

 A Reference Guide for English Studies

The Romantic Movement in English Poetry

The Family Romance of the Impostor-poet Thomas Chatterton

The Romantic School

The Romantic Triumph

The Rackham Journal of the Arts and Humanities

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