Tag: books

Audiobooks- Listening To Literature Online

Audio Book

What Do You Know About Podcasts ?

Summary:

In a few short years, the amateur digital spewing phenomenon known as blogging has become an Internet fixture and has spawned a few explosive online successes (MySpace, YouTube) and more than a few bloggers whose opinions became valued professional resources. Like so many of the good things on the web, what began as projects of individual dedication became an important addition to our social and economic fabric.

Now, the rise of podcasts has led to what may become an addit…

In a few short years, the amateur digital spewing phenomenon known as blogging has become an Internet fixture and has spawned a few explosive online successes (MySpace, YouTube) and more than a few bloggers whose opinions became valued professional resources. Like so many of the good things on the web, what began as projects of individual dedication became an important addition to our social and economic fabric.

Now, the rise of podcasts has led to what may become an addition to our cultural fabric. There are a host of sites that will allow you to download audio books for a fee, as an alternative to buying the cassette or CD. The costs of these downloads aren’t any bargain compared to the audio or printed copy; you are simply spared the chore of seeking out the product in a brick-and- mortar store.

A more interesting phenomenon that has arisen in conjunction with podcast technology is the introduction of websites that provide free audio books. These books are, for the most part, classics that are in the public domain; no usage permission from author or publisher is required. Also of interest is the fact that many of these books are read by amateurs – that is to say, untrained actors or voices. There is no such thing as amateur status when it comes to consuming literature.

Some of these amateurs have become veterans in their own right. These people are volunteers solicited by the websites that provide these audio feeds and who have produced large amounts of work: one Southern California housewife has recorded more than one hundred chapters for the website Librivox. Some of the plays provided via free podcast are voiced by collections of actors – one per role.

While Librivox focuses on classics, Podiobooks.com provides serialized audio presentations of recent publications and books that have yet to be published. Their website allows you to “subscribe” to a book (for no fee) and receive a chapter a week via email. Even books that have been completed and are listed in the Podiobooks catalogue are delivered one chapter at a time. Because much of this writing is current, the site suggests that donations to authors are not out of line. Podiobooks is promoting the notion that cross-fertilization of books in both printed and spoken format will heighten interest in both.

Then there is the blog-oriented format of Dead White Males. This site is heavy on the literary reflections of its founder, provided in print. There are essays on elements of Shakespeare and other great authors, along with a blog site that allows for commentary on the essays. Incorporated into the site are a dozen podcasts ranging from modern poetry to Hardy’s “Return of the Native”. This site is like attending a lit seminar with no chronological limitations.

Project Gutenberg is a website founded by Michael Hart, the gentleman who claims to have invented the ebook in 1971. Those must have taken days to download. In any case, the web site has a healthy category of ebooks in multiple languages available for download. Some have been created for this website and others provided by volunteers or other websites. Project Gutenberg is an archive that claims to be the largest resource for free audiobooks on the web.

This is a sampling of sites and each of them has its own approach to the same end: providing free literature online. A laudable goal, worthy of the early anarchy that characterized the birth of the Internet.

A Profile Of Alice Waters

Chez Panisse

A Chef’s Delight

Summary:

Her Restaurant, Chez Panisse, located in Berkely, Calif., opened its doors in 1971. Named after a trilogy of classic films by Marcel Pagnol, the restaurant was founded by a group of idealists, including, of course, Alice Waters. The menu changes daily, as you can only order a 3-4 course prix fixe menu. With reservations only, the restaurant is designed to feature seasonal and locally grown foods. Prices also vary by night of the week, ranging from $55 Mondays to $85 Saturda…

Her Restaurant

Chez Panisse, located in Berkely, Calif., opened its doors in 1971. Named after a trilogy of classic films by Marcel Pagnol, the restaurant was founded by a group of idealists, including, of course, Alice Waters. The menu changes daily, as you can only order a 3-4 course prix fixe menu. With reservations only, the restaurant is designed to feature seasonal and locally grown foods. Prices also vary by night of the week, ranging from $55 Mondays to $85 Saturdays, per person, before tax and gratuity. In 1980, an affiliated Cafe opened upstairs to the restaurant, to provide an a la carte alternative to the downstairs restaurant.

Originally French cuisine, much of Waters’ inspiration behind the menu comes from France. Her affinity for locally grown organic produce came from the practices she saw in France upon visiting, and she made it her goal to capture and master that way of cooking back in California. She exceeded her goal by not only bringing a different way of eating and thinking to the Western world, and West coast for that matter, but by creating a new sort of cuisine altogether: California cuisine.

In 2007, her restaurant was among the Top 50 Best Restaurants in the World, while in 2006, it came in at #20, among other notables like Charlie Trotter’s and Alan Ducasse’s restaurants.

Books

Most of the books Alice Waters has written have been about her restaurant Chez Panisse. Other topics include supporting local farms, and purchasing seasonal produce. Here’s a list of just some of her books:

California Fresh Harvest: A Seasonal Journey through Northern California (California Fresh)
Chez Panisse Cafe Cookbook
Chez Panisse Cooking
Chez Panisse Fruit
Chez Panisse Vegetables
Chez Panisse Menu Cookbook
Chez Panisse Pasta, Pizza, Calzone
Fanny at Chez Panisse : A Child’s Restaurant Adventures with 46 Recipes, a storybook and cookbook for children
Slow Food : The Case for Taste (Arts and Traditions of the Table: Perspectives on Culinary History)

She is releasing a new book October 2, called The Art of Simple Food.

The Edible Schoolyard Project

With huge influence in the city of Berkeley, Calif., Alice has set to teaching kids about the importance of the slow food movement. The Slow Food movement defines the importance of knowing where your food comes from, and not eating food for convenience-sake, but rather for quality sake. Many have written on the topic and reached out to make change, but few have approached the matter as Alice has: by teaching the children.

The project, administered through Martin Luther King Jr. schools, provides students with a one-acre organic garden, and a kitchen classroom to apply slow food movement concepts. Students can learn how to grow, maintain, and cook their own produce. With the concept called “from seed to table,” program administrators hope children will better learn the connection between what they eat and where it comes from. To read the message Alice Waters sends in regards to this program, click here.

Organic and Seasonal Food Movement

“Alice and Chez Panisse have become convinced that the best-tasting food is organically grown and harvested in ways that are ecologically sound, by people who are taking care of the land for future generations,” – a quote from Chez Panisse.com

For her restaurant’s cuisine, Alice put together a network of over 60 local organic food suppliers. She is very curious about each vegetable or fruit she picks up at farmer’s markets. She claims an inquisitive nature is best while picking out your produce. To view the New York Times video of Alice Waters assessing farmer’s market produce, click here.

Sources:
New York Times
Chez Panisse.com
Top 50 Best Restaurants in the World
Edible Schoolyard

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A Growing Demand for Poetry Books

Poetry quote

Poetry Gaining Popularity

Summary:

Where were you when American poetess Sylvia Plath gassed herself in her London kitchen at the age of 30 during the harsh winter of 1963?
Not perhaps the stuff our memories are made of, but all that could change. There is a distinct revival worldwide of interest in poetry and poets. This is expressed in the increased purchase of poetry books – anthologies and works by individual poets – in the new and secondhand book markets.

Where were you when American poetess Sylvia Plath gassed herself in her London kitchen at the age of 30 during the harsh winter of 1963?

Not perhaps the stuff our memories are made of, but all that could change. There is a distinct revival worldwide of interest in poetry and poets. This is expressed in the increased purchase of poetry books – anthologies and works by individual poets – in the new and secondhand book markets.

There are a number of reasons for this:

The internet allows the discussion and publication of poetry in a way previously impossible considering the uneconomic nature of the physical publishing poetry and publishing critiques, both amateur and academic.

The brash and materialistic eighties preceded the fantastic and terrified nineties. Now here we are here in the middle of the first decade of the 21st century, more sober and reflective, wondering where the world is going.

Out of this a generation is emerging a present-day version of the 60’s and 70’s dreamers and idealists. They want more than self-help books, more than herbal remedies and fatuous fantasies. There is a return to serious intellectual examination and spiritual actualization.

And by serious I don’t mean lacking in humor. I’m talking about intellectual acuity (take the works of travel poet Bill Bryson for instance) compared to idiotic ramblings (say the books of creative conspiracy theorist David Icke). Bryson is funny and perceptive while Icke is obtuse and laughable. There’s a big difference. We are moving away from weak thoughts to profundity.

Can there be any explanation other than this when a 17-year-old youth enters our bookshop asking for The Complete Works of Byron, or when a blonde girl no older than 15 says she is searching for the poems of Shelley?

In a decade of book-selling this has never happened before. Suddenly we are buying poetry books again to meet demand, and retrieving the slim poetry books we relegated to boxes in the basement, to create a special poetry section.

This makes sense of the revival of interest in the sixties ballad-poets: Leonard Cohen and Joan Baez. Once again Bob Dylan is speaking to the contemporary generation. T.S. Eliot and Ted Hughes are being discussed again. The demand for the work of Lebanese poet Kahlil Gibran can barely be met. Dylan Thomas is revisited. There is renewed interest in the war poets and so-called world poetry: the Senegalese, Thai, French and Swedish poets.

And why not? It is possible because the books are available and affordable, thanks to the international online book-buying market and the renewed interest in poetic thought.

Can a rediscovery of Shakespeare’s sonnets and Milton’s Paradise Lost be far off? Horde any old poetry books and poetry anthologies you still have. You could catch your children reading them one day in a way you never did.
Call it poetic justice.

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Francis Bacon Too Dull For Shakespeare?

Bacon & Shakespeare

Bacon or Shakespeare ?

Summary:

Whoever wrote Shakespeare, he must have been a lively fellow. Virginia M. Fellow’s book, The Shakespeare Code, makes a very strong case for Francis Bacon’s authorship of the oeuvre of William Shakespeare, based on historical evidence as well as on statements found in cipher in Shakespeare’s works. She’s not alone in this; many have come to the conclusion that Shakespeare’s works were not written by the actor William Shakespeare. Quite a few people support the claim that Bacon…

Whoever wrote Shakespeare, he must have been a lively fellow. Virginia M. Fellow’s book, The Shakespeare Code, makes a very strong case for Francis Bacon’s authorship of the oeuvre of William Shakespeare, based on historical evidence as well as on statements found in cipher in Shakespeare’s works. She’s not alone in this; many have come to the conclusion that Shakespeare’s works were not written by the actor William Shakespeare. Quite a few people support the claim that Bacon is the true author of this literary treasure—think Mark Twain, for instance, who wrote “To write with powerful effect, he must write out the life he has led—as did Bacon when he wrote Shakespeare.”

Amidst the various competing claims and the arguments quoted for each case, one of the lines of reasoning used by those advocating authorship by someone other than Bacon is that Francis Bacon could not possibly have written Shakespeare’s plays and sonnets because he was a dull and boring fellow, more at home in the world of law than that of drama. Some have called him a “cold fish,” not remotely capable of affinity with the often rowdy or hilarious atmosphere evoked in the plays of the Immortal Bard.

This presents an interesting argument. It’s true that Bacon spent most of his adult working life in the service of the law, but was he therefore dull? Could Bacon the crisp public servant and statesman—barrister, Solicitor General, Attorney General, Lord Chancellor—have had a more hidden side that generally escaped public notice? There are good places to search for an answer: in his biographies and in his own writings.

As for biographical comments on the lighter side of Bacon’s nature, there are many. His first biographer, Dr. William Rawley, who worked for him for years as a literary secretary and functioned as his chaplain as well, records a remarkable statement by Francis as a young boy. Queen Elizabeth I often had her Lord Keeper’s prodigy child (believed to be her own firstborn son) over at court. Rawley writes: “Being asked by the queen how old he was, he answered with much discretion, being then but a boy, that he was two years younger than Her Majesty’s happy reign; with which answer the queen was much taken.”

Within the circle of his friends, Bacon was known as a lover of jest and word play. Alfred Dodd, Bacon’s excellent biographer, quotes the poet Ben Johnson, Bacon’s secretary and friend for many years, who once wrote this tribute to Bacon:

“His language was nobly censorious when he could pass by a jest.”

Dodd also quotes an eye witness account by Dr. Rawley:

“One morning, after a night’s illness, he [Bacon] dictated no fewer than 308 anecdotes, says Dr. Rawley, who published them in 1671. ‘This collection his Lordship made out of his memory without turning any book.’ Lord Macaulay [another biographer] declared in 1848 that it reigned supreme as ‘the best collection of jests in the world.’”

Bacon’s own writings clearly show his love for the written word—its serious as well as its comical side. Few people realize the amazing volume of literary and scientific works produced by Francis Bacon, nor the masterful, witty and often poetic quality of his writing—he being the man to whom we owe such pithy aphorisms as “knowledge is power.” For instance, his series of fifty-eight essays “moral and civil” contains passages and phrases that rival the best prose ever produced in the English language. These short essays offer profound and sometimes humorous reflections on a wide range of topics: Friendship, Truth, Death, Health, Fortune, and True Greatness, to name just a few.

Would the following sentence, that opens the first essay, “Of Truth,” have occurred to the mind of a dullard?

“What is truth? said jesting Pilate; and would not stay for an answer.”

Essay number 24, “Of Simulation and Dissimulation,” begins with a concise, astute observation that is as true today as in the bygone days of Elizabeth I:

“Dissimulation is but a faint kind of policy, or wisdom; for it asketh a strong wit and a strong heart to know when to tell truth, and to do it; therefore it is the weaker sort of politicians that are the great dissemblers.”

His easy entitled “Of Delays” is laced with clever, light-footed phrases that could easily have found a fitting home in a Shakespeare play:

“Fortune is like the market, where, many times, if you can stay a little, the price will fall. (…) There is surely no greater wisdom than well to time the beginning and onsets of things. Dangers are no more light, if they once seem light; and more dangers have deceived men than forced them; nay, it were better to meet some dangers halfway, though they came nothing near, than to keep too long a watch upon their approaches; for if a man watch too long, it is odds he will fall asleep. (…) The ripeness or unripeness of the occasion (as we said) must ever be well weighed; and generally it is good to commit the beginnings of all great actions to Argus with his hundred eyes, and the ends to Briareus with his hundred hands, first to watch and then to speed….”

And in “Of Followers and Friends” (Essay 48), how’s this for a memorable opening line:

“Costly followers are not to be liked, lest, while a man maketh this train longer, he make his wings shorter.”

Francis Bacon dull? Those who voice this opinion to argue he could not possibly have authored Shakespeare would do well to look for better reasons, for dull this great man most certainly was not!

References:

Bacon, Francis – Essays (various editions, including Penguin Classics paperback)
Dodd, Alfred – Francis Bacon’s Personal Life Story (Rider & Company, 1986)
Fellows, Virginia M. – The Shakespeare Code (Snow Mountain Press, 2006)
Rawley, William – The Life of the Right Honorable Francis Bacon, Baron of Verulam, Viscount St. Alban (1657)

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5 Funny Love Poems

THE PEOPLE'S PARK IN LIMERICK

Summary:

When most people think of love poems, they think of serious and soulful expressions of passion. Long sonnets by Shakespeare or romantic poems by Browning and Lord Byron are the norm for love poetry. However, funny love poems can be good for a laugh. They may not be romantic, but they do give your friends something to enjoy. Here are 5 funny limericks from anonymous authors.

Funny Love Poems

When most people think of love poems, they think of serious and soulful expressions of passion. Long sonnets by Shakespeare or romantic poems by Browning and Lord Byron are the norm for love poetry. However, funny love poems can be good for a laugh. They may not be romantic, but they do give your friends something to enjoy.

Some of the best funny love poems are limericks. Limericks started in Ireland and follow a standard form of five lines and a rhyme scheme of aabba. Here are a few limericks written by anonymous authors:

There once was an old man of Lyme
Who married three wives at a time
When asked “Why a third?”
He replied, “One’s absurd!
And bigamy, Sir, is a crime.”

There was a young fellow named Hammer
Whose had an unfortunate stammer
“The b-bane of my life”
Said he, “Is m-m-my wife
D-d-d-d-d-d-damn ‘er!”

She made friends with a young undertaker;
Her last boyfriend had forsaken her.
But she started to curse
When he turned up in a hearse.
She said next time I’ll date a baker!

There was a young lady named Constance,
From boys she wouldn’t stand any nonsense.
If her partners grew deft
She would lead with her left;
The results would not weigh on her conscience.

My sweetheart and I are just wed.
Already I wish I were dead.
Two weeks she’s been spending.
It was time never ending.
We are thousands of pounds in the red!

Limericks are fairly easy to write if you can rhyme well, so you might try writing a limerick yourself that includes the name of your friend or loved one. This is a good way to make a funny love poem that is personalized.

You can find more information about funny poems at:
http://www.love-poems-quotes.info/funny-love-poems.html

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James Bond

James Bond

History and All Things James Bond 007

 

History and All Things James Bond 007

By Ben Smith

Being James Bond 007…Bond…James Bond…All the ladies love him and the men want to be him!

Originally a fictitious character created by author Ian Fleming, who incidentally was a keen Ornithologist and named James Bond after a Caribbean Bird Expert in his first Bond novel – “Casino Royale”! Ian Fleming had no idea of the hype and unrivaled phenomenon that was to come with his character and Bond materialised into one of the best known and best loved spies the world has ever known.

Who plays Bond? Well only the most debonair, sexy, handsome, suave and sophisticated, charming actors need apply with chiseled features and a voice that would melt an iceburg, ageless and timeless and totally unstoppable. Each of the actors who have played Bond have all given the Agent their own brand of spice and originality shaping and changing the character slightly. Actors to have played bond are David Niven, George Lazenby, Sir Roger Moore, Sean Connery, Timothy Dalton and Pierce Brosnan. Of course, until recently, Bond had a certain well groomed, never a hair out of place look until, in addition to the prerequisites above, the rugged Daniel Craig broke the mould and added a bit of roughness and edginess to the character.

Of course without the music the Bond films would be silent and not as intensely action packed. The title sequence, the music, the talents of the composers such as John Barry, Monty Norman and David Arnold, to name just a handful, have all made unforgettable music and help invoke the passions and danger that is Bond. Those theme tunes are often named after the title of the film – but not always – on the odd occasion the Film Theme will differ from the Theme song and these are highlighted below:

James Bond Theme (Dr No, Monty Norman Orchestra 1962), From Russia With Love (Matt Munro 1964), Goldfinger (Shirley Bassey 1964), Thunderball (Tom Jones 1965), You Only Live Twice (Nancy Sinatra 1967), Look of Love (Casino Royale – Serigo Mendez and Brasil 66 1967), On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (John Barry Orchestra 1969), We Have All the Time in the World (Louis Armstrong 1969), Diamonds are Forever (Shirley Bassey 1971), Live & Let Die (Paul McCartney & Wings 1973), The Man With the Golden Gun (Lulu 1974), Nobody Does It Better (The Spy Who Loved Me – Carly Simon 1977), Moonraker (Shirley Bassey 1979), For Your Eyes Only (Sheena Easton 1981), All Time High (Octopussy – Rita Coolidge 1983), Never Say Never Again (Lani Hall 1983), A View to a Kill (Duran Duran 1985), The Living Daylights (A-ha 1987), License to Kill (Gladys Knight 1989), Goldeneye (Tina Turner 1995), Tomorrow Never Dies (Sheryl Crow 1997), The World is Not Enough (Garbage 1999), Die Another Die (Madonna 2002), You Know my Name (Casino Royale – Chris Cornell 2006), Another Way to Die (Quantum of Solace – Alicia Keys and Jack Black).

Of course last but not least, his favourite tipple has always been the iconic Martini…Shaken not Stirred…

Affordable James Bond Tribute Band Shaken Not Stirred

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Victorian Literature

Victorian Authors

 

Victorian Literature

By Angelina Grey

The Victorian era or the Victorian period refers to the period of June 1837 to January 1901, as it was the period when Queen Victoria ruled the British Empire. The Victorian era is known as a period of prosperity and development for the British Empire. The period was marked by industrial development, rise of a larger stronger, as well as more educated middle class.

The era was preceded by the Georgian period and succeeded by the Edwardian period. A major feature of the Victorian period however has been the development in the field of art and culture. This period is characterized by intense and prolific adventurism in the field of literature, especially by novelists and poets.

The 19th century was witness to the growth of the novel as the leading form of literature, as far as the English language was concerned. Pieces by pre-Victorian writers like Walter Scott and Jane Austen, had mastered both closely-observed social satire, as well as adventure stories. Popular works were able to set up a market for novels amongst the reading public. The 19th century is many a time considered to be a high point in British literature, along with other countries like the United States of America, France, as well as Russia. Books, along with novels in particular, became omnipresent, and the Victorian novelists were able to churn out masterpieces, with continuous appeal.

Some of the most illustrated and talented Victorian novelists include Robert Browning, Christina Rossetti, Emily Bronte, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Lewis Carroll, Edward Bulwer-Lytton, Charles Dickens, Wilkie Collins, Benjamin Disraeli, George Eliot, George Meredith, H. G. Wells, Bram Stoker, Elizabeth Gaskell, George Gissing, Thomas Hardy, A. E. Housman, Rudyard Kipling, Robert Louis Stevenson, Philip Meadows Taylor, Alfred Lord Tennyson, Anthony Trollope, George MacDonald, G.M. Hopkins, Oscar Wilde and William Thackeray.

Victorian novels, used to be influenced by the large extensive novels of responsiveness of the preceding age. As it is, they often were more of idealized portraits of the difficult lives, where hard work, perseverance, love and luck would win out in the end. They portrayed a scenario, where virtue would be rewarded and the evil would be suitably punished. This formula was a striking feature of the earlier Victorian fiction. The situation, however, became more complex, with the progress of the century. By the 1880s and 90s, books became more realistic and at times even grimmer.

As it is, the Victorian age continues to be a major chapter in the long and illustrious history of the English language. The works of the period are often very relevant in contemporary times.

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Sherlock Holmes

Sherlock Holmes

 

 

Sherlock Holmes – The First of a Long Line of Crime Scene Investigators

By Don Penven

The adventures of Sherlock Holmes began in 1887 with the publication of A Study in Scarlet, the first of four novels and 56 short stories penned by British author, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Few fictional characters have survived the test of time, but Holmes continues to thrill, and yet befuddled many readers to this day. Motion pictures and TV documentaries keep the legend alive.

Holmes and Watson-a Dynamic Duo

The exploits of Holmes, and his roommate and biographer, Dr. John H, Watson, have fascinated countless generations of crime fans eager to learn more about this London-based “consulting detective,” whose uncanny abilities defy normal thought-processes of most Holmes devotees. Through skillful narration, using the words of Holmes, Watson and also third-person script, Conan Doyle mesmerized his followers with Holmes’ use of logical reasoning, the ability to devise virtually any form of disguise, all coupled with an in-depth knowledge of forensic science.

Author Conan Doyle stated that the inspiration for Homes was the persona of Dr. Joseph Bell, for whom he clerked at the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary. He also admitted to using snippets from lecturer, Sir Henry Littlejohn.

Keeping Track of the Criminal Population

A system of criminal identification was implemented in Europe prior to Conan Doyle’s introduction of his master detective. Alphonse Bertillon. a French anthropologist, introduced his system of anthropometry, a method requiring precise measurements of the bone structures of incarcerated criminals. Bertillon’s formula of measurements was used to verify the re-arrest of the criminal element. It was not until 1903, as a result of the Will West/William West case, in which these two convicts had identical anthropometry measurements, they looked alike, but their fingerprints did not match. Soon after this, anthropometry was shelved to make way for the new science of fingerprint identification. As it turns out–Will and William West were identical twins.

The Introduction of Fingerprint Science

During this same fateful year when fingerprint identification was heralded as a new science, Conan Doyle published the Adventures of the Norwood Builder, in which a bloody fingerprint provides a solid clue to the nature of the crime in question.

Fingerprint identification reigns-supreme as a virtually infallible means of identification. But some forensic specialists would challenge this determination, countering that DNA profiling is a far more accurate means of identifying a perpetrator. No doubt this debate will rage on for some time to come.

The CSI Phenomenon

One of the most successful television dramas of the past decade is “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation.” Along with its progeny, CSI Miami and CSI New York, this series has done more to influence how crimes are solved than all of the textbooks on the subject combined. Unlike so many “cop shows,” the CSI-series has created a new public awareness-to the point that many affected crime victims expect their particular brush with the criminal element to be solved within an hour (less the time for commercials), using futuristic methods and crime scene equipment. The CSI characters utilize the most innovative forensic examination equipment and work in pristine, shiny new laboratories equipped with every conceivable evidence discovery, evaluation and identification tool imaginable. But just taking into account the economic stress most crime labs are feeling, cost often outweighs practicality.

No doubt, most people would agree that Sherlock Holmes was the ultimate model for today’s CSIs, even if they never read a single one of Conan Doyle’s novels or short stories. The very name serves as a monument to the fictional character that frequently set forth from his lodgings at 221b Baker Street to pursue evil-doers wherever their crimes may have occurred.

Crime scene investigation has become a topic of interest for thousands of people. Some revel in the gory details from the crime scene, while others are seeking more information on how to become a CSI. The CSI TECH Blog contains dozens of articles covering just how CSIs investigate a crime scene and process the physical evidence found there. Satisfy your curiosity and visit this fact filled reference source: http://www.csitechblog.com/.

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