Tag: audio books

The Lord Of The Rings Audio Book

J R Tolkien

Is The Lord Of The Rings Audio Book Suitable For Tolkien Purists?

The Lord of the Rings trilogy has taken the world by storm over the last few years. J.R.R. Tolkien’s classic stories have been given a new lease of life thanks to the fantastic cinematic world of Peter Jackson. His film adaptations captured the spirit of the original novels and created a whole new army of Tolkien fans. They were released in three installments as The Fellowship of the Ring (2001), The Two Towers (2002) and The Return of the King (2003). As an aside, in 1978 th…

The Lord of the Rings trilogy has taken the world by storm over the last few years. J.R.R. Tolkien’s classic stories have been given a new lease of life thanks to the fantastic cinematic world of Peter Jackson. His film adaptations captured the spirit of the original novels and created a whole new army of Tolkien fans. They were released in three installments as The Fellowship of the Ring (2001), The Two Towers (2002) and The Return of the King (2003). As an aside, in 1978 the animator Ralph Bakshi created an animated version of the story, attracting more fans to the world of the Shire and Middle Earth (though not to the same degree as Jackson’s creation).

However, despite the popularity of the novels and the films, many people are unaware of the wonderful Lord of the Rings audio book. The audio book is attracting a sizable fan base, although purists might sneer at the idea of an audio book version of the novel. However, the classic text read aloud brings a whole new dimension to the story and may even provide new insights into the plot. Also, consider the convenience of being able to listen to the novels whilst on the move: in the car, on the train or plane, for example. Maybe you’d like some entertainment whilst sunning yourself on the beach but can’t stand the glare of the sun on the white pages of a book!

Are there different versions of the Lord of the Rings Audio Book?

Yes, there are several versions of the story, but perhaps the best known is read by actor Robert Inglis. This is a mammoth work which runs to forty six CDs! The recording is first rate and is completely uncut, which means that you’re going to need quite a few days to get through the entire collection! For LOTR devotees this could be the first choice, especially if authenticity is your primary concern.

However, there is another extremely popular Lord of the Rings audio book produced by the BBC. You need to be aware that BBC audio books are usually in a radio-theater style rather than a simple, straightforward reading of the novel. This might be preferable if you are seeking a more entertaining, or fun, experience. The choice between the two styles of audio book is ultimately up to you and your personal preferences.

How much will all this cost me?

As you can imagine, forty six CDs is going to cost quite a bit of money. Think of it, though, as an investment in your future entertainment. In fact, the CDs could cost you up to $100 if bought brand new in the high street. However, thanks to the marvel that is the internet, it is possible to locate discounted, used copies from a number of suppliers. If cost is an issue for you then it would certainly pay to shop around on the web and locate a number of suppliers to compare prices.

Even die-hard Tolkien fans will find the Lord of the Rings audio book an entertaining experience.

Audiobooks- Listening To Literature Online

Audio Book

What Do You Know About Podcasts ?

Summary:

In a few short years, the amateur digital spewing phenomenon known as blogging has become an Internet fixture and has spawned a few explosive online successes (MySpace, YouTube) and more than a few bloggers whose opinions became valued professional resources. Like so many of the good things on the web, what began as projects of individual dedication became an important addition to our social and economic fabric.

Now, the rise of podcasts has led to what may become an addit…

In a few short years, the amateur digital spewing phenomenon known as blogging has become an Internet fixture and has spawned a few explosive online successes (MySpace, YouTube) and more than a few bloggers whose opinions became valued professional resources. Like so many of the good things on the web, what began as projects of individual dedication became an important addition to our social and economic fabric.

Now, the rise of podcasts has led to what may become an addition to our cultural fabric. There are a host of sites that will allow you to download audio books for a fee, as an alternative to buying the cassette or CD. The costs of these downloads aren’t any bargain compared to the audio or printed copy; you are simply spared the chore of seeking out the product in a brick-and- mortar store.

A more interesting phenomenon that has arisen in conjunction with podcast technology is the introduction of websites that provide free audio books. These books are, for the most part, classics that are in the public domain; no usage permission from author or publisher is required. Also of interest is the fact that many of these books are read by amateurs – that is to say, untrained actors or voices. There is no such thing as amateur status when it comes to consuming literature.

Some of these amateurs have become veterans in their own right. These people are volunteers solicited by the websites that provide these audio feeds and who have produced large amounts of work: one Southern California housewife has recorded more than one hundred chapters for the website Librivox. Some of the plays provided via free podcast are voiced by collections of actors – one per role.

While Librivox focuses on classics, Podiobooks.com provides serialized audio presentations of recent publications and books that have yet to be published. Their website allows you to “subscribe” to a book (for no fee) and receive a chapter a week via email. Even books that have been completed and are listed in the Podiobooks catalogue are delivered one chapter at a time. Because much of this writing is current, the site suggests that donations to authors are not out of line. Podiobooks is promoting the notion that cross-fertilization of books in both printed and spoken format will heighten interest in both.

Then there is the blog-oriented format of Dead White Males. This site is heavy on the literary reflections of its founder, provided in print. There are essays on elements of Shakespeare and other great authors, along with a blog site that allows for commentary on the essays. Incorporated into the site are a dozen podcasts ranging from modern poetry to Hardy’s “Return of the Native”. This site is like attending a lit seminar with no chronological limitations.

Project Gutenberg is a website founded by Michael Hart, the gentleman who claims to have invented the ebook in 1971. Those must have taken days to download. In any case, the web site has a healthy category of ebooks in multiple languages available for download. Some have been created for this website and others provided by volunteers or other websites. Project Gutenberg is an archive that claims to be the largest resource for free audiobooks on the web.

This is a sampling of sites and each of them has its own approach to the same end: providing free literature online. A laudable goal, worthy of the early anarchy that characterized the birth of the Internet.

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